Saturday, September 10, 2011

Public Warning on Health Care & internet Usage & DoE

I read an article in USA Today that said basically that the father of Amy Winehouse [ a singer who died at young age], thinks she died from a seizure. That is possible in some circumstances, but what I want to warn the public about is: that another article said she had Librium, a prescription tranquilizer, and alcohol in her blood stream when she died. The warning is NEVER mix tranquilizers or any mind-altering prescription [those with Rx on them prescribed by MD or P.A. or N.P.] with alcohol. That is often a lethal combination. Of course, if you have read much of my writings over 20 yr's time, you know I am generally opposed to alcohol on principle. It is also a drug, and it is very dangerous especially in some circumstances. The circumstances that could make alcohol lethal are: 1) when someone is not accustomed to it [has no built up over time tolerance to it]; 2) is in very cold climate without sufficient external warmth, 3) has other drugs in their blood stream, 4) has liver disease; 5) has certain other diseases that affect the body's ability to detoxify itself, 6) the obvious one, when a person drinks so much that their blood is part alcohol which causes unconsciousness and death.
So just do not ever mix drugs or take combinations of drugs without consulting a bona-fide, registered Pharmacist to see if dangerous. Medical Doctors, Physicians's assistant's, Nurse Practitioners do not know as much about pharmacology as Pharmacists do. Tranquilizers and alcohol are known to be a lethal combination. Lethal means deadly.
Also another public warning of a different sort, for those who use the internet and email:Very informative and scary article
about doppelganger domains that siphon off emails with typos:
http://www.cnn.com/2011/TECH/web/09/09/email.typos.stolen.data.wired/index.html/
Quotes:
"The e-mails they collected included one that listed the full configuration details for the external Cisco routers of a large IT consulting firm, along with passwords for accessing the devices. Another e-mail going to a company outside the U.S. that manages motorway toll systems provided information for obtaining full VPN access into the system that supports the road tollways. The e-mail included information about the VPN software, usernames, and passwords." +... "Company information wasn't the only data at risk of interception. The researchers were also able to gather a wealth of employee personal data, including credit card statements and information that would help someone access an employee's online bank accounts." +..."Some of the companies whose doppelganger domains have already been taken by entities in China included Cisco, Dell, HP, IBM, Intel, Yahoo and Manpower." ++++
Another quote from article about internet in Germany, about fining sites ' owners that add Facebook "like" buttons to their sites: "Officials in Schleswig-Holstein state took aim with a new initiative last month, when a regional data protection agency announced it would hit website owners who embed Facebook's "Like" button with a 50,000 euro ($70,000) fine. Authorities said the button allows companies to track personal data of Facebook users." That article at:
http://www.cnn.com/2011/TECH/social.media/09/08/germany.facebook.privacy/index.html/.
Also a bit off topic but of concern to me is this info about the US Post office: http://news.yahoo.com/no-more-mail-ben-franklin-think..
about US post office at risk--cannot meet the 5.5 billion dollar payment into the fed treasury. Quotes:
"Yet one of the biggest problems isn't mail flow or labor or other costs. Rather, it's a requirement imposed by Congress five years ago that the post office set aside $55 billion in an account to cover future medical costs for retirees. The idea was to put $5.5 billion a year into the account for 10 years. That's $5.5 billion the post office doesn't have.
No other government agency is required to make such a payment for future medical benefits, so why not drop it for the post office." +
..."The Postal Service is not included in the federal budget, but the Treasury Department account that receives that payment is.
That means that when the post office deposits that money, it counts as income in the federal budget. So, if it doesn't make the payment, the federal budget deficit appears $5.5 billion bigger, something few members of Congress are likely to favor."
And on the topic of the Post office remember it is a duty of Congress as listed in Section 8 of the US Constitution which I am including here for you to read:Section 8of US Constitution with the enumerated duties of the US Congress, from constitution online at:
http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/articlei#section8:
Section 8.
The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United States; but all duties, imposts and excises shall be uniform throughout the United States;
To borrow money on the credit of the United States;
To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes;
To establish a uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States;
To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and fix the standard of weights and measures;
To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securities and current coin of the United States;
To establish post offices and post roads;
To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries;
To constitute tribunals inferior to the Supreme Court;
To define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offenses against the law of nations;
To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water;
To raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money to that use shall be for a longer term than two years;
To provide and maintain a navy;
To make rules for the government and regulation of the land and naval forces;
To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the union, suppress insurrections and repel invasions;
To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the militia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed in the service of the United States, reserving to the states respectively, the appointment of the officers, and the authority of training the militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress;
To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding ten miles square) as may, by cession of particular states, and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat of the government of the United States, and to exercise like authority over all places purchased by the consent of the legislature of the state in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, dockyards, and other needful buildings;--And
To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by this Constitution in the government of the United States, or in any department or officer thereof."
And other significant information for all US citizens are these two quotes, from the book review in NY times today online about the book "That used to be us":
quoting the US federal Dept of Education Secretary :: “Currently about one-fourth of ninth graders fail to graduate high school within four years. Among the O.E.C.D. countries, only Mexico, Spain, Turkey and New Zealand have higher dropout rates than the United States.”...+
"Or this, from the Pentagon via Arne Duncan: “Seventy-five percent of young Americans, between the ages of 17 to 24, are unable to enlist in the military today because they have failed to graduate from high school, have a criminal record or are physically unfit.”

Gloria Poole; @my apt in Missouri; 9:48am;10-Sept-2011